Comparable in some ways to the western ode, the ghazal is an Arabic verse form which was adopted by medieval Persian poets to write about suffering arising from the death or absence of a loved one. The ghazal is also marked by its formal intricacy. For example, the last couplet of a ghazal should include a proper noun, which is often the name of the poet.

the ghazal is an Arabic verse form which was adopted by medieval Persian poets to write about suffering arising from the death or absence of a loved one. The ghazal is also marked by its formal intricacy. For example, the last couplet of a ghazal should include a proper noun, which is often the name of the poet.

The singing of ghazals is an established and popular form of transmission in India, and Reddy’s compositions have been sung by many of India’s leading ghazal singers, such as Jagjit Singh, Pankaj Udhas and Talat Aziz.

Reddy considers himself to be writing in the common tongue of India, ‘Hindustani’, which draws its words from both Hindi and Urdu. His poems are often reflections on social issues and, as is typical of the ghazal, to pain, sorrow, and the common problems which face everyone in day-to-day life. Many of his poems could be described as consolatory, conveying a message of love and hope even in the midst of conflict.

The moderator for the event, Hindi Poet Dr Padmesh Gupta said that Rajesh Reddy is one of the very few Indian poets whose writing is accepted and respected by both a Hindi and an Urdu readership.

The event was attended by a number of writers, poets, journalists, and dignitaries from the UK, such as Radio broadcaster Chamal Lal Chaman, former head of BBC Hindi Dr. Achala Sharma, journalist broadcaster Parvez Alam, writer Divya Mathur, journalist Shikha Varshney, Lalit Mohan Joshi, Aruna Ajitasaria MBE, Councillor Zakia Zubairi and many others.